Job 2:7–8 Commentary: Know Job’s Genuineness and Kindheartedness

So went Satan forth from the presence of the LORD, and smote Job with sore boils from the sole of his foot to his crown. And he took him a potsherd to scrape himself with; and he sat down among the ashes.

- Job 2:7–8

So went Satan forth from the presence of the LORD, and smote Job with sore boils from the sole of his foot to his crown. And he took him a potsherd to scrape himself with; and he sat down among the ashes.

– Job 2:7–8

Thoughts on Today’s Verse…

From these verses, we can see Job’s genuineness and kindheartedness. Though he was the greatest man in the east, he never prided himself based on his status or cherished his status, nor did he care how others viewed him during the trials. Instead, he took a potsherd to scrape away the surface of the sore boils while sitting among the ashes. Comparing us with Job who is genuine and kind, we often cautiously disguise ourselves for face, fame and gain, and status, and do our utmost to cover up our flaws. We are unwilling to allow others to see our shortcomings, which makes us think that life is too exhausting, and brings us great pain. Some people even feel that they are less happy than the dead and always lash out against everyone and everything. This is the bitter consequence that living for face, status, and fame and gain brings upon people. When Job encountered hardships and lost face and status, only God had a place in his heart and Job cared only God’s view of him. Therefore, Job not only didn’t complain against God, but praised God’s great power. Only if we obey God’s sovereignty and arrangements like Job and fear God and shun evil, can we gain God’s praise and feel at peace in our hearts. Just as God says, “Let us read Job 2:7–8: ‘So went Satan forth from the presence of Jehovah, and smote Job with sore boils from the sole of his foot to his crown. And he took him a potsherd to scrape himself with; and he sat down among the ashes.’ This is a description of Job’s conduct when sore boils sprouted upon his body. At this time, Job sat in the ashes as he endured the pain. No one treated him, and no one helped him lessen the pain of his body; instead, he used a potsherd to scrape away the surface of the sore boils. Superficially, this was merely a stage in Job’s torment, and bears no relation to his humanity and fear of God, for Job spoke no words to demonstrate his mood and views at this time. Yet Job’s actions and his conduct are still a true expression of his humanity. In the record of the previous chapter we read that Job was the greatest of all the men of the east. This passage of the second chapter, meanwhile, shows us that this great man of the east should take a potsherd to scrape himself while sitting among the ashes. Is there not an obvious contrast between these two descriptions? It is a contrast that shows us Job’s true self: Despite his prestigious standing and status, he had never loved nor paid them any attention; he cared not how others viewed his standing, nor was he concerned about whether his actions or conduct would have any negative effect on his standing; he did not indulge in the riches of status, nor did he enjoy the glory that came with status and standing. He only cared about his value and the significance of his living in the eyes of Jehovah God. Job’s true self was his very substance: He did not love fame and fortune, and did not live for fame and fortune; he was true, and pure, and without falsity” (“God’s Work, God’s Disposition, and God Himself II”).


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